Road through midnight : a civil rights memorial /

"In this book, Jessica Ingram presents photographs of landscapes that, to unaware passersby, look like nearly any other place in the Deep South: a fenced-in backyard, a dirt road covered with overgrowth, a field grooved with muddy tire prints. However, these seemingly ordinary places hold pivot...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Ingram, Jessica (Author)
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press : in association with the Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University, 2020.
Series:Documentary arts and culture.
Subjects:
Online Access:Click here for full text at JSTOR
Description
Summary:"In this book, Jessica Ingram presents photographs of landscapes that, to unaware passersby, look like nearly any other place in the Deep South: a fenced-in backyard, a dirt road covered with overgrowth, a field grooved with muddy tire prints. However, these seemingly ordinary places hold pivotal, often tragic, stories of the civil rights movement, though rarely is there a plaque with dates or names or any manmade indication of their importance. Most of these "un-memorialized" places are where bodies of African Americans-activists, paper mill workers, sharecroppers, and children-were found, victims of racial violence. These images are interspersed with oral histories from victims' families, journalists, and investigators, as well as newspaper microfiche, FBI files, and other archival ephemera. The narrative intensity grows in power, complexity, and depth as the book goes on and the history unfolds"--
At first glance, Jessica Ingram's landscape photographs could have been made nearly anywhere in the American South: a fenced-in backyard, a dirt road lined by overgrowth, a field grooved with muddy tire prints. These seemingly ordinary places, however, were the sites of pivotal events during the civil rights era, though often there is not a plaque with dates and names to mark their importance. Many of these places are where the bodies of activists, mill workers, store owners, sharecroppers, children and teenagers were murdered or found, victims of racist violence. Images of these places are interspersed with oral histories from victims' families and investigative journalists, as well as pages from newspapers and FBI files and other ephemera.<br> <br> <br> <br> With Road Through Midnight , the result of nearly a decade of research and fieldwork, Ingram unlocks powerful and complex histories to reframe these commonplace landscapes as sites of both remembrance and resistance and transforms the way we regard both what has happened and what's happening now--as the fight for civil rights goes on and memorialization has become the literal subject of contested cultural and societal ground.<br> <br>
Item Description:Print version record.
Physical Description:1 online resource
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN:9781469655888
1469655888
9781469654249
1469654245