The Roman salute : cinema, history, ideology /

"The raised-arm salute was the most popular symbol of Fascism, Nazism, and related political ideologies in the twentieth century and is said to have derived from an ancient Roman custom. Although modern historians and others employ it as a matter of course, the term 'Roman salute' is...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Winkler, Martin M.
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Columbus : Ohio State University Press, ©2009.
Series:UPCC book collections on Project MUSE.
Subjects:
Art
Online Access:Click here for full text at JSTOR
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100 1 |a Winkler, Martin M.  |0 http://id.loc.gov/authorities/names/n84116298 
245 1 4 |a The Roman salute :  |b cinema, history, ideology /  |c Martin M. Winkler. 
260 |a Columbus :  |b Ohio State University Press,  |c ©2009. 
300 |a 1 online resource (xi, 223 pages) :  |b illustrations 
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504 |a Includes bibliographical references (pages 195-212) and indexes. 
505 0 |a Saluting gestures in Roman art and literature -- Jacques-Louis David's Oath of the Horatii -- Raised-arm salutes in the United States before fascism : from the pledge of allegiance to Ben-Hur on stage -- Early cinema : American and European epics -- Cabiria : the intersection of cinema and politics -- Gabriele d'Annunzio and Cabiria -- Fiume : the Roman salute becomes a political symbol -- From D'Annunzio to Mussolini -- Nazi cinema and its impact on Hollywood's Roman epics : from Leni Riefenstahl to Quo vadis -- Visual legacies : antiquity on the screen from Quo vadis to Rome -- Cinema : from Salome to Alexander -- Television : from Star trek to Rome -- Conclusion. 
520 |a "The raised-arm salute was the most popular symbol of Fascism, Nazism, and related political ideologies in the twentieth century and is said to have derived from an ancient Roman custom. Although modern historians and others employ it as a matter of course, the term 'Roman salute' is a misnomer. The true origins of this salute can be traced back to the popular culture of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that dealt with ancient Rome: historical plays and films. The visual culture of stage and screen from the 1890s to the 1920s was chiefly responsible for the wide familiarity of Europeans and Americans with forms of the raised-arm salute and made it readily available for political purposes. The Roman Salute: Cinema, History, Ideology by Martin M. Winkler presents extensive evidence for the modern origin of the raised-arm salute from well before the birth of Fascism and traces its varieties and its dissemination. The continuing presence of certain aspects of Fascism makes an examination of all its facets desirable, especially when the true origins of a symbol as potent as the salute and the history of its dissemination are barely known to classicists and historians of ancient Rome on the one hand, and to scholars of modern European history, on the other. Thus this book will appeal to classicists and historians, including film historians, and will be of interest to readers beyond the academy."--  |c Page 4 of cover 
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