Owning up : poverty, assets, and the American dream /

This text is about assets and the difference they can make in the lives of the poor. It expands the concept of asset building to encompass a range of skills and support systems that are necessary to lift people out of poverty. It identifies four types of asset: economic, human, social and natural.

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Miller-Adams, Michelle, 1959-
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Washington, D.C. : Brookings Institution Press, ©2002.
Series:Book collections on Project MUSE.
UPCC book collections on Project MUSE. Archive Political Science and Policy Studies Foundation.
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Online Access:Click here for full text
Description
Summary:This text is about assets and the difference they can make in the lives of the poor. It expands the concept of asset building to encompass a range of skills and support systems that are necessary to lift people out of poverty. It identifies four types of asset: economic, human, social and natural.

Despite the recent success of welfare reform in moving people off public assistance and into jobs, most of America's working poor are still unable to accumulate even the most minimal of assets. Even when they are getting by, they lack many of the resources--tangible and intangible--that provide middle-class Americans with a sense of security, stability, and a stake in the future. In Owning Up , Michelle Miller-Adams demonstrates how asset-building programs, used in combination with traditional income-based support, can be an effective means for helping millions of American out of poverty. Miller-Adams expands the traditional concept of assets to encompass a range of tools, experiences, resources, and support systems that are necessary if asset building is to serve as an effective anti-poverty strategy. She identifies four types of assets that can represent sources of wealth for low-income individuals and communities: economic human social, and natural assets. Economic assets include equity, retirement savings, and other financial holdings. Human assets include education, knowledge, skills, and talents. Included among social assets are the networks of trust and reciprocity that bind communities together. Natural assets include the land, water, air and other natural resources we depend on for survival. Owning Up also examines five organizations at the forefront of building assets for the poor. Their stories are told through the eyes of individuals whose lives they have helped transform. These organizations have all developed effective strategies for building assets, and Miller-Adams identifies them as models to be emulated elsewhere. The profiled organizations include: Neighborhoods Incorporated of Battle Creek, Michigan. Its innovative strategies seek to increase home ownership and promote neighborhood revitalization in poor communities. The Watershed Research and Training Center. This local organization strengthens the natural resource-based eco

Item Description:Print version record.
Physical Description:1 online resource (x, 224 pages)
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:0815706413
9780815706410
1280812672
9781280812675
Author Notes:

Michelle Miller-Adams is a visiting assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at Kalamazoo College. She is the author of The World Bank: New Agendas in a Changing World (Routledge, 1999) and is a contributor to several edited volumes. She is also former vice president for programs at the Twentieth Century Fund (now the Century Foundation).