The virtues of economy governance, power, and piety in late medieval Rome /

"This book explores the transformation of Roman political culture from c.1350 to c.1450, and its implications for the history of the city, the Papacy, and the modern state. Specifically, it examines the gradual transition of Roman political elites from a commitment to governing Rome as a free c...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Palmer, James A. 1977- (Author)
Format: Electronic eBook
Language:English
Imprint: Ithaca [New York] : Cornell University Press, 2019.
Subjects:
Online Access:Available in Books at JSTOR: Evidence-Based Acquisition.
Available in ProQuest Ebook Central - Academic Complete.
Description
Summary:"This book explores the transformation of Roman political culture from c.1350 to c.1450, and its implications for the history of the city, the Papacy, and the modern state. Specifically, it examines the gradual transition of Roman political elites from a commitment to governing Rome as a free city-commune to a willingness to act as the governing agents of a sovereign papacy. It emphasizes that understanding this transition requires recognition of Roman political engagement not merely with a civic society, constituted of citizens of the city-commune, but with the broader political society of Rome in its guise as the spiritual capital of Latin Christendom. Through an analysis of the transformative effects of everyday Roman politics, this book reframes the story of the establishment of papal sovereignty in Rome as the product of synergy between papal ambitions and local political culture"--

The humanist perception of fourteenth-century Rome as a slumbering ruin awaiting the Renaissance and the return of papal power has cast a long shadow on the historiography of the city. Challenging this view, James A. Palmer argues that Roman political culture underwent dramatic changes in the late Middle Ages, with profound and lasting implications for city's subsequent development. The Virtues of Economy examines the transformation of Rome's governing elites as a result of changes in the city's economic, political, and spiritual landscape.

Palmer explores this shift through the history of Roman political society, its identity as an urban commune, and its once-and-future role as the spiritual capital of Latin Christendom. Tracing the contours of everyday Roman politics, The Virtues of Economy reframes the reestablishment of papal sovereignty in Rome as the product of synergy between papal ambitions and local political culture. More broadly, Palmer emphasizes Rome's distinct role in evolution of medieval Italy's city-communes.

Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:9781501742385 (online)
Author Notes:

James A. Palmer is Assistant Professor of History at Florida State University. Follow him on Twitter @Jamespqr77.