City views in the Habsburg and Medici courts depictions of rhetoric and rule in the sixteenth century /

"In City Views in the Habsburg and Medici Courts, Ryan E. Gregg relates how Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and Duke Cosimo I of Tuscany employed city view artists such as Anton van den Wyngaerde and Giovanni Stradano to aid in constructing authority. These artists produced a specific style of c...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Gregg, Ryan E., 1980- (Author)
Format: Electronic eBook
Language:English
Imprint: Leiden ; Boston : Brill, [2019]
Series:Brill's studies in intellectual history, volume 294
Brill's studies on art, art history, and intellectual history ; volume 35
Subjects:
Online Access:Available in ProQuest Ebook Central - Academic Complete.
Description
Summary:"In City Views in the Habsburg and Medici Courts, Ryan E. Gregg relates how Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and Duke Cosimo I of Tuscany employed city view artists such as Anton van den Wyngaerde and Giovanni Stradano to aid in constructing authority. These artists produced a specific style of city view that shared affinity with Renaissance historiographic practice in its use of optical evidence and rhetorical techniques. History has tended to see city views as accurate recordings of built environments. Bringing together ancient and Renaissance texts, archival material, and fieldwork in the depicted locations, Gregg demonstrates that a close-knit school of city view artists instead manipulated settings to help persuade audiences of the truthfulness of their patrons' official narratives"--
In City Views in the Habsburg and Medici Courts , Ryan E. Gregg relates how Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor, and Duke Cosimo I of Tuscany employed city view artists such as Anton van den Wyngaerde and Giovanni Stradano to aid in constructing authority. These artists produced a specific style of city view that shared affinity with Renaissance historiographic practice in its use of optical evidence and rhetorical techniques. History has tended to see city views as accurate recordings of built environments. Bringing together ancient and Renaissance texts, archival material, and fieldwork in the depicted locations, Gregg demonstrates that a close-knit school of city view artists instead manipulated settings to help persuade audiences of the truthfulness of their patrons' official narratives.
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 369-406) and index.
ISBN:9789004386167 (online)
ISSN:0920-8607 ;