The 7 keys to communicating in Mexico : an intercultural approach /

The authors present a practical set of guidelines for people wishing to communicate professionally in Mexico or with Mexicans, following the model of the similar books by Kelm and Victor on Brazil and Japan of presenting on key cultural concepts. Good communication requires more than knowing the lan...

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Bibliographic Details
Authors / Creators: Kelm, Orlando R., 1957- (Author), Roble Hernández Pozas, Olivia del (Author), Victor, David A., 1956- (Author)
Other Authors / Creators:Roble Hernández Pozas, Olivia del, author.
Victor, David A., 1956- author.
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, [2020]
Subjects:
Online Access:Click here for full text at JSTOR
Description
Summary:The authors present a practical set of guidelines for people wishing to communicate professionally in Mexico or with Mexicans, following the model of the similar books by Kelm and Victor on Brazil and Japan of presenting on key cultural concepts. Good communication requires more than knowing the language. Olivia Hernandez-Pozas, Orlando Kelm, and David Victor, seasoned cross-cultural trainers for businesspeople, provide a guide through Victor's LESCANT model (Language, Environment, Social Organization, Context, Authority, Nonverbal, and Time). Each chapter addresses one of these topics and demonstrates how to evaluate the differences between Mexico and others in North America, presenting examples to help people avoid common communication mistakes. The book is generously peppered with photographs to provide visual examples. The authors complete the book with a case study chapter on a business interaction between Mexican and other North Americans (NAs). They then gathered comments from various NA professionals working in Mexico and Mexicans working with US professionals about the interactions in the case, providing helpful observations about the situation. The book straddles some language and communication topics, international relations, and reaches into the business community.

How do you build successful professional connections with colleagues from Mexico? While most books focus simply on how to avoid common communication mistakes, this book leads its readers to an understanding of how to succeed and thrive within the three cultures, Mexico, the US, and Canada. Kelm, Hernandez-Pozas and Victor present a set of practical guidelines for communicating professionally with Mexicans, both in Mexico and abroad, providing many photographs as examples. The Seven Keys to Communicating in Mexico follows the model of presenting key cultural concepts used in the earlier books by Kelm and Victor on Brazil and (with Haru Yamada) on Japan. Olivia Hernandez-Pozas, Orlando Kelm, and David Victor, well-respected research professors and seasoned cross-cultural trainers for businesspeople, guide readers through Mexican culture using Victor's LESCANT Model (an acronym representing seven key cross-cultural communication areas: Language, Environment, Social Organization, Contexting, Authority, Nonverbal Behavior, and Time). Each chapter addresses one of these topics and demonstrates how to evaluate the differences among Mexican, US, and Canadian cultures. In the final chapter the authors bring all of these cultural interactions together with a sample case study about business interactions between Mexicans and North Americans. The case study includes additional observations from North American and Mexican business professionals who offer related suggestions and recommendations.

Item Description:Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on January 14, 2020).
Physical Description:1 online resource (xviii, 252 pages)
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:1626167249
9781626167247
Author Notes:

Orlando R. Kelm , PhD, is an associate professor of Hispanic linguistics at the University of Texas at Austin, where he teaches courses in Portuguese and Spanish, focusing mainly on business language and the cultural aspects of international business communication. He also serves as the Director of the UT Portuguese Language Flagship. His research and publications center on the cultural aspects of international business and pedagogical applications of innovative technologies in language learning, focusing mainly on Latin America and Brazil. Together with coauthor David A. Victor, he published the first volume in this series, The Seven Keys To Communicating in Brazil: An Intercultural Approach (Georgetown University Press, 2016). With coauthors David A. Victor and Haru Yamada, he published the second volume in this series, The Seven Keys To Communicating in Japan: An Intercultural Approach (Georgetown University Press, 2017).

Olivia Hernandez-Pozas is associate professor at Tecnologico de Monterrey in Monterrey, Mexico, and author of works in International Business, Cultural Intelligence, and Management Education. She teaches classes of Negotiation and Intercultural communication. She is also member of the National Research System of Mexico. She is certified as advanced cultural intelligence facilitator by the Cultural Intelligence Center. She is member of the Academy of Management, and has served as member of the board, of its Management Education and Development Division.

David A. Victor , PhD, is a tenured professor of management and international business at Eastern Michigan University, as well as a consultant, author, and editor. He teaches courses on managing world business communication, international management, and international business and offers a series of seminars on doing business in various countries, including Brazil. As a consultant, he has run training programs and coached the leaders of more than 200 companies and organizations, ranging from global 500 companies to governments and nongovernmental organizations. He is also Editor-in-Chief of the Global Advances in Business Communication Journal. Among his many publications is the groundbreaking International Business Communication (HarperCollins, 1992), which introduced the LESCANT Model used as the framework for this book.