The marvellous and the monstrous in the sculpture of twelfth-century Europe /

Representations of monsters and the monstrous are common in medieval art and architecture, from the grotesques in the borders of illuminated manuscripts to the symbol of the "green man", widespread in churches and cathedrals. These mysterious depictions are frequently interpreted as embody...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Ambrose, Kirk, 1968- (Author)
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Woodbridge, United Kingdom : Boydell Press, 2013.
Series:Boydell studies in medieval art and architecture.
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Online Access:Click here for full text at JSTOR
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Summary:Representations of monsters and the monstrous are common in medieval art and architecture, from the grotesques in the borders of illuminated manuscripts to the symbol of the "green man", widespread in churches and cathedrals. These mysterious depictions are frequently interpreted as embodying or mitigating the fears symptomatic of a "dark age". This book, however, considers an alternative scenario: in what ways did monsters in twelfth-century sculpture help audiences envision, perhaps even achieve, various ambitions? Using examples of Romanesque sculpture from across Europe, with a focus on France and northern Portugal, the author suggests that medieval representations of monsters could service ideals, whether intellectual, political, religious, and social, even as they could simultaneously articulate fears; throughout, he is careful to present the carvings in their physical and social contexts
Richly-illustrated consideration of the meaning of the carvings of non-human beings, from centaurs to eagles, found in ecclesiastical settings. <br> <br> Representations of monsters and the monstrous are common in medieval art and architecture, from the grotesques in the borders of illuminated manuscripts to the symbol of the "green man", widespread in churches and cathedrals. These mysterious depictions are frequently interpreted as embodying or mitigating the fears symptomatic of a "dark age". This book, however, considers an alternative scenario: in what ways did monsters in twelfth-century sculpture help audiences envision, perhaps even achieve, various ambitions? Using examples of Romanesque sculpture from across Europe, with a focus on France and northern Portugal, the author suggests that medieval representations of monsterscould service ideals, whether intellectual, political, religious, and social, even as they could simultaneously articulate fears; he argues that their material presence energizes works of art in paradoxical, even contradictory ways. In this way, Romanesque monsters resist containment within modern interpretive categories and offer testimony to the density and nuance of the medieval imagination.<br> <br> KIRK AMBROSE is Associate Professor & Chair, Department of Art and Art History, University of Colorado Boulder.
Item Description:Print version record
Physical Description:1 online resource (xii, 187 pages) : illustrations
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 147-178) and index
ISBN:178204549X
9781782045496
ISSN:2045-4902