Hannah Arendt and the Negro Question /

While acknowledging Hannah Arendt's keen philosophical and political insights, Kathryn T. Gines claims that there are some problematic assertions and oversights regarding Arendt's treatment of the ""Negro question."" Gines focuses on Arendt's reaction to the desegr...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Gines, Kathryn T., 1978-
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Language notes:English.
Imprint: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, 2014.
Subjects:
Online Access:Click here for full text at JSTOR
Description
Summary:While acknowledging Hannah Arendt's keen philosophical and political insights, Kathryn T. Gines claims that there are some problematic assertions and oversights regarding Arendt's treatment of the ""Negro question."" Gines focuses on Arendt's reaction to the desegregation of Little Rock schools, to laws making mixed marriages illegal, and to the growing civil rights movement in the south. Reading them alongside Arendt's writings on revolution, the human condition, violence, and responses to the Eichmann war crimes trial, Gines provides a systematic analysis of anti-black racism in Arendt's
A systemic analysis of anti-Black racism in the work of political philosopher Hannah Arendt. While acknowledging Hannah Arendt's keen philosophical and political insights, Kathryn T. Gines claims that there are some problematic assertions and oversights regarding Arendt's treatment of the "Negro question."Gines focuses on Arendt's reaction to the desegregation of Little Rock schools, to laws making mixed marriages illegal, and to the growing civil rights movement in the south. Reading them alongside Arendt's writings on revolution, the human condition, violence, and responses to the Eichmann war crimes trial, Gines provides a systematic analysis of anti-black racism in Arendt's work. "Hannah Arendt: political progressive and committed anti-racist theorist? Think again. As Kathryn Gines makes inescapably clear, for Arendt the "Negro" was the problem, whether in the form of savage "primitives" inseparable from Heart-of-Darkness Africa, social climbers trying to get their kids into white schools, or unqualified black university students dragging down academic standards. [Gines's] boldly revisionist text reassesses the German thinker's categories and frameworks." --Charles W. Mills, Northwestern University "Takes on a major thinker, Hannah Arendt, on an important issue--race and racism--and challenges her on specific points while raising philosophical and methodological shortcomings." --Richard King, Nottingham University "Gines carefully moves through Arendt scholarship and Arendt's texts to argue persuasively that explicit discussions of the "Negro question" point up the limitations of her thinking." --Kelly Oliver, Vanderbilt University "Gines has delivered an intellectually challenging book, that presents one of the most important figures in Western philosophy of the 2nd half of the 20th century in a different and, perhaps, somewhat less favorable perspective." -- Philosophia "Offers a wealth of research that will be valuable to scholars and graduate students interested in how racial bias operates in Arendt's major works. Gines's writing style is lucid and to the point, and her engagement with secondary sources is comprehensive." -- Hypatia
Item Description:Print version record.
Physical Description:1 online resource (194 pages)
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 131-165) and index.
ISBN:0253011752
1306546206
9780253011756
9781306546201
Author Notes:

Kathryn T. Gines is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the Pennsylvania State University. She is editor (with Donna-Dale L. Marcano) of Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy and a founder of the journal Critical Philosophy of Race.