The Philadelphia Negro : a social study /

In 1897, a young sociologist who was already marked as a scholar of the highest promise submitted to the American Association of Political and Social Sciences a "plan for the study of the Negro problem." The product of that plan was the first great empirical book on the Negro in American s...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Du Bois, W. E. B. 1868-1963.
Other Authors / Creators:Anderson, Elijah.
Eaton, Isabel.
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, ©1996.
Subjects:
Online Access:Click here for full text at Project MUSE
Description
Summary:In 1897, a young sociologist who was already marked as a scholar of the highest promise submitted to the American Association of Political and Social Sciences a "plan for the study of the Negro problem." The product of that plan was the first great empirical book on the Negro in American society. William Edward Burghardt DuBois (1868-1963), Ph. D. from Harvard (class of 1890), was given a temporary post as Assistant in Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania in order to conduct in-depth studies on the Negro community in Philadelphia. The provost of the university was interested and sympathetic, but DuBois knew early on that white interest and sympathy were far from enough. He knew that scholarship was itself a great weapon in the Negro's struggle for a decent life. The Philadelphia Negro was originally published by the University of Pennsylvania Press in 1899. One of the first works to combine the use of urban ethnography, social history, and descriptive statistics, it has become a classic work in the social science literature. Both the issues the book raises and the evolution of DuBois's own thinking about the problems of black integration into American society sound strikingly contemporary. Among the intriguing aspects of The Philadelphia Negro are what it says about the author, about race in urban America and about social science at the time, but even more important is the fact that many of DuBois's observations can be made - in fact are being made - by investigators today. In his introduction to this edition, Elijah Anderson traces DuBois's life before his move to Philadelphia. He then examines how the neighborhood studied by DuBois has changed over the years, and he compares the status of blacks today with their status when the book was initially published
Twenty-three research papers written by Liberman and colleagues at Haskins Laboratories charts the techniques, methods and insights discovered about speech perception over a period of five decades. The topics span a number of research dilemmas, for example creating machine produced speech in 1944 when technology had not risen to the researchers' imagination level. Other subjects such as speech perception research, motor theory research, and investigations in auditory and phonetic modes, are shown in process, i.e. the errors and reversals as well as the successes. Annotation copyright by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
Item Description:Print version record.
Physical Description:1 online resource (xxxvi, 520 pages) : illustrations, maps
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:0585196842
0812215737
9780585196848
9780812215731
Author Notes:Civil rights leader and author, William Edward Burghardt Du Bois was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts on February 23, 1868. He earned a B.A. from both Harvard and Fisk universities, an M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard, and studied at the University of Berlin. He taught briefly at Wilberforce University before he came professor of history and economics at Atlanta University in Ohio (1896-1910). There, he wrote The Souls of Black Folk (1903), in which he pointed out that it was up to whites and blacks jointly to solve the problems created by the denial of civil rights to blacks. In 1905, Du Bois became a major figure in the Niagara Movement, a crusading effort to end discrimination. The organization collapsed, but it prepared the way for the founding of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), in which Du Bois played a major role. In 1910, he became editor of the NAACP magazine, a position he held for more than 20 years.

Du Bois returned to Atlanta University in 1932 and tried to implement a plan to make the Negro Land Grant Colleges centers of black power. Atlanta approved of his idea, but later retracted its support. When Du Bois tried to return to NAACP, it rejected him too.

Active in several Pan-African Congresses, Du Bois came to know Fwame Nkrumah, the first president of Ghana, and Jono Kenyatta the president of Kenya. In 1961, the same year Du Bois joined the Communist party, Nkrumah invited him to Ghana as a director of an Encyclopedia Africana project. He died there on August 27, 1963, after becoming a citizen of that country.

(Bowker Author Biography)