Cézanne : finished, unfinished /

Examines the finished and unfinished work of Paul Cezanne, providing insight into the creative process of the nineteenth-century Impressionist painter.

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Cézanne, Paul, 1839-1906.
Other Authors / Creators:Baumann, Felix Andreas.
Other Corporate Authors / Creators:Kunstforum Wien.
Kunsthaus Zürich.
Format: Book
Language:English
Imprint: Ostfildern-Ruit : Hatje Cantz, [2000]
Subjects:
Description
Summary:Examines the finished and unfinished work of Paul Cezanne, providing insight into the creative process of the nineteenth-century Impressionist painter.
The story of Cezanne's fame and influence would be incomplete without taking into account the impact of his unfinished paintings.... This book is the first to take an extended look at these paintings.... Detailed essays that compare finished paintings with so-called unifinished ones provide a completely new insight into the creative proces of the father of modernism.
Item Description:"Published on the occasion of the exhibition 'Cezanne: finished--unfinished' at the Kunstforum Wien, 20 January to 25 April 2000, and at the Kunsthaus Zürich, 5 May to 30 July 2000"--Title page verso.
Physical Description:408 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 396-401)
ISBN:3775708790
9783775708791
Author Notes:Paul Cezanne, who was one of the most influential and powerful painters of the postimpressionist phase, led the way to twentieth-century cubism and abstract art. He was born in Aix-en-Provence, the son of a prosperous banker. It was his close friend, the novelist Emile Zola, who steered him to art and persuaded him to study in Paris. He was at first closely allied with his fellow painter, Pissarro and other impressionists, but gradually drew apart from them in his painstaking and dedicated search for a new style.

In 1886 Cezanne retired to Provence, where, because he was financially independent, he could totally concentrate on his art. The careful balance of tones, building form with color into almost geometrical (indeed, almost cubist) compositions, distinguishes his work. A firm grounding in the great French classical tradition turned him away from the romantic and impressionist toward the abstract art of the future. Cezanne, particularly in his later years, was a solitary man, not an intellectual, and he wrote very little. His watercolors are often as masterful as his oil paintings.

(Bowker Author Biography)