A writer at war : Vasily Grossman with the Red Army, 1941-1945 /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Grossman, Vasiliĭ.
Other Authors / Creators:Beevor, Antony, 1946-
Vinogradova, Luba.
Format: Book
Language:English
Russian
Edition:First American edition.
Imprint: New York : Pantheon Books, [2005]
Subjects:
Retention:Retained for Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust (EAST) http://eastlibraries.org/retained-materials
Description
Summary:Edited and translated from the Russian by Antony Beevor and Luba Vinogradova Knopf Canada is proud to present a masterpiece of the Second World War, never before published in English, from one of the great Russian writers of the 20th century -- a vivid eyewitness account of the Eastern Front and "the ruthless truth of war." When the Germans invaded Russia in 1941, Vasily Grossman became a special correspondent for the Red Star, the Red Army's newspaper.A Writer at War-- based on the notebooks in which Grossman gathered raw material for his articles -- depicts the crushing conditions on the Eastern Front, and the lives and deaths of soldiers and civilians alike. It also includes some of the earliest reportage on the Holocaust. In the three years he spent on assignment, Grossman witnessed some of the most savage fighting of the war: the appalling defeats of the Red Army, the brutal street fighting in Stalingrad, the Battle of Kursk (the largest tank engagement in history), the defense of Moscow, the battles in Ukraine and much more. Historian Antony Beevor has taken Grossman's raw notebooks, and fashioned them into a narrative providing one of the most even-handed descriptions -- at once unflinching and sensitive -- we have ever had of what he called "the ruthless truth of war."
Physical Description:xxi, 378 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 352-364) and index.
ISBN:0375424075
Author Notes:Grossman, a graduate in physics and mathematics from Moscow University, worked first as a chemical engineer and became a published writer during the mid-1930s. His early stories and novel deal with such politically orthodox themes as the struggle against the tsarist regime, the civil war, and the building of the new society.

Grossman served as a war correspondent during World War II, publishing a series of sketches and stories about his experiences. Along with Ehrenburg, he edited the suppressed documentary volume on the fate of Soviet Jews, The Black Book. In 1952 the first part of his new novel, For the Good of the Cause, appeared and was sharply criticized for its depiction of the war. The censor rejected another novel, Forever Flowing (1955), which was circulated in samizdat and published in the West. The secret police confiscated a sequel to For the Good of the Cause, the novel Life and Fate, in 1961, but a copy was smuggled abroad and published in 1970. Grossman's books were issued in the Soviet Union in the late 1980s and have met with both admiration and, on part of the nationalist right wing, considerable hostility.

(Bowker Author Biography)