Theory and methods in political science /

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Bibliographic Details
Other Authors / Creators:Marsh, David, 1946-
Stoker, Gerry.
Format: Book
Language:English
Edition:Second edition.
Imprint: Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.
Series:Political analysis.
Subjects:
Retention:Retained for Eastern Academic Scholars' Trust (EAST) http://eastlibraries.org/retained-materials
Table of Contents:
  • List of Figures, Tables and Boxes
  • Preface to the Second Edition
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Introduction
  • The discipline of political science: a celebration of diversity
  • What is politics? What is it that political scientists study?
  • What is a scientific approach to politics?
  • Connecting to the world of politics
  • Is there a standard method for undertaking political science?
  • Conclusion
  • 1. A Skin not a Sweater: Ontology and Epistemology in Political Science
  • Ontology and epistemology
  • Different approaches to ontology and epistemology
  • Ontology and epistemology in political science: two cases
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • Part I. Approaches
  • 2. Behavouralism
  • The rise of the behavioural movement and its core characteristics
  • Criticisms of the behavioural approach
  • The strengths of the behavioural approach: an example
  • Conclusion: the behavioural legacy in the twenty-first century
  • Further reading
  • 3. Rational Choice
  • The development of rational choice theory
  • The key commitments and assumptions of the mainstream variant
  • Criticisms of rational choice theory
  • Developments: where is rational choice going?
  • Conclusions
  • Further reading
  • 4. Institutionalism
  • Introduction
  • The 'traditional' institutional approach
  • The rise of the 'new institutionalism'
  • What's new about new institutionalism? The core features of the approach
  • New institutionalist dilemmas
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • 5. Feminism
  • Debates within feminism
  • Feminism and political science
  • Critical responses to feminist political science
  • Conclusion: the way forward
  • Further reading
  • 6. Interpretive Theory
  • The importance of interpretation
  • Varieties of interpretation
  • An anti-foundational approach to interpretation
  • Criticisms of interpretive theory
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • 7. Marxism
  • The development of Marxism
  • What has Marxism to offer?
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • 8. Normative Theory
  • Logical positivism and the death of political philosophy
  • Interpretive theory
  • Critical theory and dialectics
  • Deontological theory and value pluralism
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • Part II. Methods
  • 9. Qualitative Methods
  • The role of qualitative methods in political science
  • The epistemological underpinnings of qualitative methods
  • Criticisms of qualitative research
  • Illustration of qualitative research
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • 10. Quantitative Methods
  • The collection and management of data
  • The power of description
  • Tables and inferential statistics
  • Multivariate analysis
  • Beyond ordinary least squares
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • 11. Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Methods
  • Quantitative and qualitative methods: a false dichotomy?
  • Combining research methods
  • Problems of combination
  • Two case studies
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • 12. Comparative Methods
  • Introduction
  • Theory and the comparative method
  • Basic forms of comparative explanation
  • Large Ns: quantitative comparative strategies
  • Limitations of the quantitative comparative approach
  • Small Ns: qualitative comparative strategies
  • Quantity or quality? Quantitative versus qualitative comparative research
  • Conclusion: challenges to the comparative method
  • Further reading
  • Part III. Issues
  • 13. Structure and Agency
  • Introduction: structure and agency--a problem for all?
  • Structure and agency: what's really in it for us?
  • The postmodern onslaught
  • The morphogenetic approach
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • 14. Institutions and Ideas
  • Introduction
  • Don't worry about the philosophy...
  • Why institutions? Producing a 'conventional' wisdom in political science
  • Changing the conventional wisdom: reinventing institutions
  • Historical and rational institutionalism
  • Explaining change and stability: the turn to ideas
  • Rationalism and ideas
  • Historical institutionalism and ideas
  • Conclusion: rival ontologies and progress in political science
  • Further reading
  • 15. Conclusion
  • The importance of ontological and epistemological issues
  • The growth of diversity in the formal study of politics
  • Beware gatekeeping
  • A plea for dialogue
  • Bibliography
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index