The Prospects of International Trade Regulation : From Fragmentation to Coherence.

Finding ways to bring coherence in the different bits and pieces of international trade regulation.

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Cottier, Thomas.
Other Authors / Creators:Delimatsis, Panagiotis.
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
Subjects:
Local Note:Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2022. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Online Access:Click to View
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245 1 4 |a The Prospects of International Trade Regulation :  |b From Fragmentation to Coherence. 
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264 4 |c ©2011. 
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505 0 |a Cover -- Half-title -- Title -- Copyright -- Contents -- Figures -- Tables -- Contributors -- Preface and Acknowledgements -- Table of cases -- 1. International Court of Justice -- 2. Court of Justice (EU) -- 3. General Court (EU) -- 4. European Patent Office (EPO) -- 5. WTO Panels and Appellate Body -- 6. GATT -- 7. European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) -- 8. European Commission of Human Rights -- 9. NAFTA -- 10. Other Abritration -- 11. Domestic Courts -- (a) United States -- (b) Canada -- Abbreviations -- Introduction: Fragmentation and coherence in international trade regulation: analysis and conceptual foundations -- A. The challenges of fragmentation -- B. Fragmentation in international law -- C. Fragmentation in WTO dispute settlement -- I. WTO law coordination -- II. The role of bilateral and regional agreements -- III. Decisions by regional international tribunals and res judicata -- IV. Some tentative concluding remarks -- D. Conceptual responses to fragmentation -- I. The hermeneutical approach: systemic legal reasoning and policy coordination -- II. The constitutionalist approach: systemic governance order and common values -- III. A third way: The multilayered governance approach - a pragmatic synthesis -- IV. The fundamental critique: missing societal foundations in international relations -- E. Insights from legal theory -- I. The nature and role of law -- II. The benchmark of effective, efficient and legitimate legal systems -- III. Coherence as an instrument to enhance effectiveness, efficiency and legitimacy -- 1. Formal consistency: the legalistic model of rules -- 2. Substantial coherence: the constitutionalist model of principles -- F. Promoting coherence through multilayered constitutionalism -- Bibliography -- Part I: Constitutional issues in international trade regulation. 
505 8 |a 1 The constitutionalisation of international trade law -- A. Introduction -- B. Key concepts and methdodological problems -- C. How far has the WTO been constitutionalised to date? -- I. Constitutional principles constraining Members -- II. Democracy -- III. Rule of law: constitutional principles constraining the WTO -- IV. (Judicial) constitutionalisation of and through WTO dispute settlement -- D. The WTO: private or public interest? -- I. The communal approach to public interest -- 1. Public interest and private interest -- 2. A communal interpretation of Article XX GATT -- II. The sovereigntist approach to public interest -- 1. `Public interest' in limitation clauses and general exception clauses -- 2. A sovereigntist interpretation of Article XXI GATT: a self-judging obligation -- III. The constitutionalist approach to public interest -- 1. International adjudication on sovereigntist clauses -- 2. A constitutionalist interpretation of exception clauses: accepting national `collective preferences' -- IV. Preliminary outlook -- E. Policy recommendations -- I. Constitutional substance -- II. Access of private actors to WTO dispute settlement and to domestic courts -- III. A multilevel judiciary -- IV. Political and legal accountability -- V. Law- and decision-making -- Bibliography -- 2 Reflections on modes of decision-making in the World Trade Organization -- A. Introduction -- B. Conceptualising a political system: legitimacy and accountability -- C. Decision-making in the WTO from a political science perspective -- I. Governance elements: member-driven, consensual and single-package oriented -- II. The WTO Secretariat in international negotiations -- D. Decision-making from a legal perspective -- I. Material perspective -- 1. Distinctions in international institutional law -- 2. Distinctions in the WTO Agreement. 
505 8 |a 3. Distinctions elaborated by Swiss constitutional theory -- 4. Further criteria in the legal and political science literature -- II. Formal perspective -- III. Designing flexible, non-consensual decision rules -- E. The vertical dimension of decision-making: The role of corporations -- I. Demand for trade policy: the missing exporters' coalitions and the changing nature of import-competing group lobbying -- II. Constructing an analytical framework for corporate trade policy interests -- III. Comparing textile industries' interest aggregation -- F. Decision-making across competing authorities -- I. The WTOs judicial interactions across intergovernmental organisations -- 1. Linkage through deference -- 2. Linkage through incorporation of other international arrangements -- 3. Presumptive exceptions and the adjudication of competing values -- II. Various logics of horizontal interaction -- G. Conclusions -- Bibliography -- 3 Regionalism: moving from fragmentation towards coherence -- A. Introduction -- B. The reality of RTAs -- I. Post-war waves of regionalism -- 1. The first wave of regionalism -- 2. The second wave of regionalism -- 3. The third wave of regionalism -- II. Regionalism and multilateralism -- III. A snapshot of today's regionalism -- IV. Regionalism in the regions -- 1. Complexity multipliers -- V. Spaghetti bowl in services and non-tariff barriers -- C. RTAs and the multilateral trading system -- I. What is wrong with regionalism? -- 1. The threat of pervasive regionalism -- 2. The threat to norms -- 3. Regionalism as Plan B -- II. A return to the Great Powers world? -- D. Towards coherence -- I. WTO-led ideas enhancing coherence -- 1. WTO soft-law disciplines on RTAs -- 1. Negotiate voluntary best-practice guidelines for RTA disciplines for new RTAs and for modifications of existing RTAs. 
505 8 |a 2. More ambitiously, negotiate a level of RTA discipline that was in between that of Article XXIV and the Enabling Clause. -- 2. New sectoral free trade agreements -- II. RTA-led ideas -- 1. Plurilateralise rules of origin and cumulation -- 2. `Anti-spaghetti' clauses in RTAs -- 3. Development friendly ROOs and cumulation -- 4. Development-friendly cumulation -- 5. Switching to an -eitheror approach' to rules of origin -- E. Conclusion -- Part II: Reforming specific areas of trade regulation -- 4 Reframing sustainable agriculture -- A. Introduction -- B. What is sustainable agriculture? -- I. Doha Round problems with sustainable agriculture -- II. The evolving debate on sustainable agriculture, trade liberalisation and food security -- C. Empirical research on attitudes towards sustainable agriculture -- I. Stakeholder surveys in Switzerland, New Zealand, Turkey and China -- I. Stakeholder perception surveys in Switzerland and New Zealand -- 1. Agricultural policies in New Zealand and Switzerland -- 2. Survey results and interpretation -- II. Stakeholder perception surveys in Turkey and China -- 1. Agricultural policies in Turkey and China -- 2. Survey Results and Interpretation -- D. The political economy of sustainable agriculture -- I. The basic policy insights from comparing the four cases -- 1. Switzerland and New Zealand -- 2. Turkey and China -- II. Policy space and WTO disciplines -- E. The development dimension -- I. WTO Disciplines -- 1. Present rules -- 2. Doha -- 3. Impact -- II. Impact of Swiss trade and agricultural policies on developing countries -- 1. Trade impact assessments -- 2. Free access for all products of least developed countries? -- III. Food security and trade -- IV. The potential of geographical indications for rural development -- V. Mobilising science and technology to ensure endogenous growth and food security. 
505 8 |a 1. Facilitating entrepreneurship and technological innovation in agriculture -- 2. Best practices -- 3. The role of public-private partnerships -- F. Concluding remarks -- References -- 5 Energy in WTO law and policy -- A. Introduction -- B. The current status of energy in WTO law (oil, gas, coal and electricity) -- I. Oil, gas and coal -- II. Electricity -- III. WTO and other instruments of international energy law -- 1. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/International Energy Agency (IEA) -- 2. Energy Charter Treaty -- 3. Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries -- 4. Multilateral environmental agreements -- 5. Regional level: European Union (EU) and North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) -- IV. Role of government procurement -- V. Unresolved and controversial issues -- C. Agenda for reform -- I. Towards a WTO Framework Agreement on Energy -- II. The basic classification of energy and energy services -- 1. Trade in energy services -- 2. Reform of classification of energy services -- III. Energy and the rules on subsidies -- 1. Renewable energy and the WTO law of subsidies -- 2. Emissions trading and subsidies: the experience of the European Union -- IV. Energy production controls and export restrictions (OPEC) -- 1. Production controls versus export restrictions -- 2. Restrictions made effective through state-trading operations -- 3. Available exceptions -- 4. Lack of competition rules in WTO -- 5. Conclusion -- V. Energy and government procurement as a climate change mitigation policy tool -- 1. Green public procurement (GPP) in the context of the Kyoto Protocol to the UNFCCC and the WTO Agreement on Government Procurement (GPA): the need for regulatory coherence -- 2. GPP and the trade concerns -- 3. GPP and the environmental exceptions -- D. Overall conclusions -- Bibliography. 
505 8 |a 6 Developing trade rules for services: a case of fragmented coherence?. 
520 |a Finding ways to bring coherence in the different bits and pieces of international trade regulation. 
588 |a Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources. 
590 |a Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2022. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.  
650 0 |a Foreign trade regulation. 
655 4 |a Electronic books. 
700 1 |a Delimatsis, Panagiotis. 
776 0 8 |i Print version:  |a Cottier, Thomas  |t The Prospects of International Trade Regulation  |d Cambridge : Cambridge University Press,c2011  |z 9781107004870 
797 2 |a ProQuest (Firm) 
856 4 0 |u https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/well/detail.action?docID=691961  |z Click to View