Management of the Effects of Coastal Storms : Policy, Scientific and Historical Perspectives.

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Quevauviller, Philippe.
Other Authors / Creators:Ciavola, Paolo.
Garnier, Emmanuel.
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Somerset : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2017.
Subjects:
Local Note:Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2022. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Online Access:Click to View
Table of Contents:
  • Cover
  • Title Page
  • Copyright
  • Contents
  • Preface
  • 1. Coastal Storms and Flooding: Regulatory Framework and Science-Policy Interactions
  • 1.1. Introduction
  • 1.2. Natural hazards and risks in coastal zones: needs to build-up a "culture of risks"
  • 1.2.1. Introduction
  • 1.2.2. Contribution of environmental policy to the development of a "culture of risks"
  • 1.2.3. Toward an integrated management of coastal zones
  • 1.2.4. Regional instruments
  • 1.2.5. Emerging "culture of risk" beyond the environment legal framework?
  • 1.2.6. Ecosystem services: a new orientation of environmental policies or an opportunity of risk socialization?
  • 1.2.7. The international society facing (coastal) natural hazards: between protection of human rights and challenges of international security
  • 1.3. Policy background
  • 1.3.1. International policies
  • 1.3.2. EU policies
  • 1.4. Science-policy interactions
  • 1.4.1. Scientific foundation of coastal risk policies
  • 1.4.2. EU Scientific framework in support of coastal risk-related policies
  • 1.4.3. Identification of research needs in the coastal risk-related policy sectors
  • 1.4.4. Interactions with the scientific community
  • 1.4.5. Science-based development of an integrated coastal risks policy
  • 1.5. Research trends
  • 1.5.1. Introduction
  • 1.5.2. EU-funded instruments
  • 1.5.3. Examples of research trends
  • 1.6. Science-policy interfacing
  • 1.6.1. Linking different actors
  • 1.6.2. Governance and knowledge transfer
  • 1.6.3. Networking needs
  • 1.6.4. Who are the users of research?
  • 1.6.5. Building-up of a "Community of Users"
  • 1.7. Conclusions
  • 2. Techniques for the Assessment of Coastal Storm Risk
  • 2.1. Introduction
  • 2.2. Definition of coastal risk
  • 2.3. Hazard time series in Europe and beyond
  • 2.3.1. Short term: hours to days
  • 2.3.2. Medium- and long term.
  • 2.4. Evaluation of coastal vulnerability
  • 2.4.1. Evaluation on the basis of critical thresholds
  • 2.4.2. Coastal risk maps
  • 2.4.3. Topographic and bathymetric surveys
  • 2.4.4. Estimation of wave parameters
  • 2.4.5. Wave set-up
  • 2.4.6. Wave run-up
  • 2.4.7. Numerical models for beach dynamics
  • 2.4.8. Development of vulnerability zones
  • 2.4.9. Development of damage curves
  • 2.4.10. Input-output economic model
  • 2.4.11. Climate change scenario and predicted losses
  • 2.5. Toward disaster risk reduction
  • 2.5.1. Monitoring the storm impact
  • 2.5.2. Operational Early Warning Systems for surges
  • 2.5.3. Operational Early Warning Systems for beach morphological changes
  • 2.6. Outlook for the future: a EU-wide system?
  • 2.7. Conclusions
  • 3. Xynthia, February 2010: Autopsy of a Foreseable Catastrophe
  • 3.1. Introduction
  • 3.2. Scenario of the crisis
  • 3.2.1. French coastlines
  • 3.2.2. La Faute-sur-Mer: "martyred" city
  • 3.2.3. The "unprecedented dogma"
  • 3.3. The historical verdict
  • 3.3.1. At the national and European levels
  • 3.3.2. The example of La Faute-sur-Mer
  • 3.4. The construction of the coastal vulnerability
  • 3.4.1. The time of the precautionary principle (Middle Age - 1900)
  • 3.4.2. The choice to live close to the sea (1900-2016)
  • 3.4.3. A national symbol: La Faute-sur-Mer
  • Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Index
  • Other titles from iSTE in Earth Systems − Environmental Engineering
  • EULA.