From Vocational to Higher Education.

This book discusses current issues in vocational and higher education and the relations between them.

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Moodie, Gavin.
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: Berkshire : McGraw-Hill Education, 2008.
Series:UK Higher Education OUP Humanities and Social Sciences Higher Education OUP Ser.
Subjects:
Local Note:Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2022. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Online Access:Click to View
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245 1 0 |a From Vocational to Higher Education. 
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264 4 |c ©2008. 
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490 1 |a UK Higher Education OUP Humanities and Social Sciences Higher Education OUP Ser. 
505 0 |a Front cover -- Half Title Page -- General Editor -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Dedication -- Contents -- List of tables -- List of boxes -- Acknowledgements -- Chapter 1: Introduction -- 1.1 Why read this book? -- 1.2 Why have sectors? -- 1.2.1 To reflect fundamental differences between types of education -- 1.2.2 To accommodate mass higher education -- 1.3 How sharply to differentiate vocational from higher education? -- 1.4 Relation to economic arrangements -- 1.5 Education's positional value -- 1.6 How many sectors? -- 1.7 Salience of student transfer -- 1.8 Qualifications frameworks and the European area -- 1.9 Comparative education -- 1.10 Conclusion -- Chapter 2: Comparing education -- 2.1 Nature of comparative education -- 2.2 'Comparative education' as a term of art -- 2.3 Functional analysis -- 2.4 History as well as geography -- 2.5 Experiment by analogy -- 2.6 The problem of induction -- 2.7 Critical realism -- 2.8 Developing a comparative method -- 2.8.1 First step: state an issue -- 2.8.2 Second step: identify identity -- 2.8.3 Third step: classify -- 2.8.4 Fourth step: generalize -- 2.8.5 Several tools will be used -- Chapter 3: Defining 'vocational education' -- 3.1 Identify identity -- 3.2 International standard classification of education -- 3.3 Defining 'vocational education' and its cognates -- 3.3.1 Establishing equivalence -- 3.3.2 Epistemological -- 3.3.3 Teleological -- 3.3.4 Hierarchical -- 3.3.5 Pragmatic -- 3.4 Discussion of the definition of 'vocational education' -- 3.5 Vocation - Beruf -- Chapter 4: Countries -- 4.1 Tertiary education in its economic and social context -- 4.2 Australia -- 4.2.1 Geography -- 4.2.2 Tertiary education overview -- 4.2.3 Higher education -- 4.2.4 Vocational education and training -- 4.2.5 Occupational regulation -- 4.3 Canada -- 4.4 United Kingdom -- 4.4.1 Scotland. 
505 8 |a 4.5 United States of America -- 4.5.1 Community or 2-year colleges -- 4.5.2 Types of institution -- 4.5.3 Different enrolment patterns in different states -- 4.5.4 California -- 4.5.5 Colorado -- 4.5.6 Texas -- Chapter 5: Qualifications frameworks -- 5.1 Overview -- 5.2 Outline of the most prominent frameworks -- 5.2.1 National qualifications framework for England, Wales and Northern Ireland -- 5.2.2 Scottish credit and qualifications framework -- 5.2.3 South African national qualifications framework -- 5.2.4 Australian qualifications framework -- 5.2.5 New Zealand national qualifications framework -- 5.2.6 European qualifications framework -- 5.3 Types of qualifications framework -- 5.4 Future of qualifications frameworks -- Chapter 6: European integration in vocational and higher education -- 6.1 The European project -- 6.1.1 The integration of Europe -- 6.1.2 Pursuit of common interests -- 6.1.3 Reform of specific sectors -- 6.1.4 Bologna's encouragement of student mobility -- 6.2 The Bologna declaration -- 6.2.1 Antecedents of the Bologna declaration -- 6.2.2 Diploma supplement -- 6.2.3 Degree structure -- 6.2.4 System of credits -- 6.2.5 Student and staff mobility -- 6.2.6 Quality assurance -- 6.2.7 European dimension -- 6.2.8 Recognition of qualifications -- 6.2.9 Prospects of the Bologna process -- 6.3 The Copenhagen declaration -- 6.3.1 Antecedents of the Copenhagen declaration -- 6.3.2 Lisbon strategy -- 6.3.3 European dimension -- 6.3.4 Transparency, information and guidance -- 6.3.5 Recognition of formal learning -- 6.3.6 Recognition of non-formal and informal learning -- 6.3.7 Quality assurance -- 6.3.8 Prospects of the Copenhagen process -- 6.4 Prospects of tertiary education in the European project -- 6.4.1 Subsidiarity -- 6.4.2 Open method of coordination -- 6.4.3 Separation of vocational and higher education -- Chapter 7: Sectors. 
505 8 |a 7.1 Overview -- 7.2 Historical development of vocational education -- 7.3 Historical separation of vocational education from general education -- 7.4 Why have sectors? -- 7.5 Two sectors -- 7.6 Three sectors -- 7.7 Four sectors -- Chapter 8: Relations between vocational and higher education -- 8.1 Different patterns of vocational education provision -- 8.2 Divide between vocational and higher education -- 8.3 Mechanisms for bridging the sectoral divide -- 8.3.1 Supra-institutional levels -- 8.3.2 Institution-wide levels -- 8.3.3 Organizational unit -- 8.3.4 Curriculum -- 8.3.5 Person -- Chapter 9: Student transfer between sectors -- 9.1 Salience of student transfer -- 9.2 Upward student transfer -- 9.2.1 Student admission ratio -- 9.2.2 California -- 9.2.3 Colorado -- 9.2.4 Texas -- 9.2.5 Scotland -- 9.2.6 Australia -- 9.2.7 Summary of transfer student admission rates -- 9.3 Reverse student transfer -- 9.3.1 Reverse transfer in the USA -- 9.3.2 Reverse transfer in Canada -- 9.3.3 Reverse transfer in Australia -- 9.3.4 Reverse transfer in New Zealand -- 9.3.5 Reverse transfer summed up -- 9.4 Student transfer policies -- 9.4.1 USA -- 9.4.2 California -- 9.4.3 Colorado -- 9.4.4 Texas -- 9.4.5 Scotland -- 9.4.6 Australia -- 9.5 Conclusion -- Chapter 10: Summary and conclusion -- 10.1 Defining vocational education -- 10.2 Comparative education -- 10.3 Countries compared -- 10.4 Tracked and generalist systems -- 10.4.1 Implications of tracked and generalist systems -- 10.5 Four tiers of tertiary education -- 10.6 Student transfer between the sectors -- 10.7 Mechanisms for bridging the sectoral divide -- 10.8 Options for structuring vocational and higher education -- 10.8.1 Segregation -- 10.8.2 Duplication -- 10.8.3 Integration -- 10.8.4 Systematizing a transfer role -- 10.8.5 Establishing an intermediate sector: higher vocational education. 
505 8 |a 10.8.6 'Wise and masterly inactivity' -- 10.9 Conclusion and future work -- References -- Index -- Back cover. 
520 |a This book discusses current issues in vocational and higher education and the relations between them. 
588 |a Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources. 
590 |a Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2022. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.  
650 0 |a Education, Higher -- Europe -- Cross-cultural studies. 
650 0 |a Education, Higher -- Cross-cultural studies. 
650 0 |a Vocational education -- Cross-cultural studies. 
655 4 |a Electronic books. 
776 0 8 |i Print version:  |a Moodie, Gavin  |t From Vocational to Higher Education: an International Perspective  |d Berkshire : McGraw-Hill Education,c2008  |z 9780335227150 
797 2 |a ProQuest (Firm) 
830 0 |a UK Higher Education OUP Humanities and Social Sciences Higher Education OUP Ser. 
856 4 0 |u https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/well/detail.action?docID=409771  |z Click to View