Up from Serfdom : My Childhood and Youth in Russia, 1804-1824.

"It was the arbitrary nature of the serfholder's power that weighed on serfs like Nikitenko, for as they discovered, even the most benevolent patron could turn overnight into an overbearing tyrant. In that respect, serfdom and slavery were the same."-Peter Kolchin, from the foreword A...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator: Nikitenko, Aleksandr.
Other Authors / Creators:Jacobson, Helen Saltz.
Format: eBook Electronic
Language:English
Imprint: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2001.
Subjects:
Local Note:Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2022. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Online Access:Click to View
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245 1 0 |a Up from Serfdom :  |b My Childhood and Youth in Russia, 1804-1824. 
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264 4 |c ©2008. 
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505 0 |a Intro -- Contents -- Foreword by Peter Kolchin -- Translator's Note -- Acknowledgments -- Maps -- Up from Serfdom -- 1. My Roots -- 2. My Parents -- 3. Father's First Attempt to Introduce Truth Where It Wasn't Wanted -- 4. My Early Childhood -- 5. Exile -- 6. Home from Exile -- 7. Father Returns from St. Petersburg -- 8. 1811: New Place, New Faces -- 9. Our Life in Pisaryevka, 1812-1815 -- 10. School -- 11. Fate Strikes Again -- 12. Waiting in Voronezh -- 13. Ostrogozhsk: I Go Out into the World -- 14. My Friends and Activities in Ostrogozhsk -- 15. My Friends in the Military -- General Yuzefovich -- The Death of My Father -- 16. Farewell, Ostrogozhsk -- 17. Home Again in Ostrogozhsk -- 18. The Dawn of a New Day -- 19. St. Petersburg: My Struggle for Freedom -- Translator's Epilogue -- Notes -- Glossary -- Index. 
520 |a "It was the arbitrary nature of the serfholder's power that weighed on serfs like Nikitenko, for as they discovered, even the most benevolent patron could turn overnight into an overbearing tyrant. In that respect, serfdom and slavery were the same."-Peter Kolchin, from the foreword Aleksandr Nikitenko, descended from once-free Cossacks, was born into serfdom in provincial Russia in 1804. One of 300,000 serfs owned by Count Sheremetev, Nikitenko as a teenager became fiercely determined to gain his freedom. In this memorable and moving book, here translated into English for the first time, Nikitenko recollects the details of his childhood and youth in servitude as well as the six-year struggle that at last delivered him into freedom in 1824. Among the very few autobiographies ever written by an ex-serf, Up from Serfdom provides a unique portrait of serfdom in nineteenth-century Russia and a profoundly clear sense of what such bondage meant to the people, the culture, and the nation. Rising to eminence as a professor at St. Petersburg University, former serf Nikitenko set about writing his autobiography in 1851, relying on his own diaries (begun at the age of fourteen and maintained throughout his life), his father's correspondence and documents, and the stories that his parents and grandparents told as he was growing up. He recalls his town, his schooling, his masters and mistresses, and the utter capriciousness of a serf's existence, illustrated most vividly by his father's lurching path from comfort to destitution to prison to rehabilitation. Nikitenko's description of the tragedy, despair, unpredictability, and astounding luck of his youth is a compelling human story that brings to life as never before the experiences of the serf in Russia in the early 1800s. 
588 |a Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources. 
590 |a Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2022. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.  
650 0 |a Nikitenko, A. -- (Aleksandr), -- 1804 or 5-1877. 
650 0 |a Critics -- Russia -- Biography. 
650 0 |a Serfs -- Russia -- Biography. 
650 0 |a Russia -- Social conditions -- 1801-1917. 
655 4 |a Electronic books. 
700 1 |a Jacobson, Helen Saltz. 
776 0 8 |i Print version:  |a Nikitenko, Aleksandr  |t Up from Serfdom  |d New Haven : Yale University Press,c2001  |z 9780300084146 
797 2 |a ProQuest (Firm) 
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